Diet & Nutrition

Don’t know what to cook: Online auto-generated meal plans


If you’re trying to reduce your food intake and make sure you’re eating a balanced diet, this is the website you need to try.

For those of us who despise maths with a passion, keeping an eye on energy intake can feel like you’re anxiously sweating through a pop quiz.

To cut the information clutter and help you FINALLY decide what to make for dinner, a website called Eat This Much was formed.

Founded by scientist Louis DeMenthon, in between his biology exams while he was trying to get fit – the premise of the website is about helping busy people eat the way they want.

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There are a couple of major pros about the website.

Flexibility to eat as you want

The website offers a range of diet plans for different types of eaters. This includes paleo options, vegetarian, vegan, keto and Mediterranean diets.

While it doesn’t offer gluten-free or dairy-free, the suggested meals are mostly based on whole foods, so you should be able to simply replace the gluten or dairy containing ingredient (bread, pasta, cheese etc) with a free-from alternative.

Energy measures

All recipes include measures of each ingredient and a total calorie count, so you can easily see how much energy each meal will provide for you.

It will also create a mini nutrition label for each recipe, showing the breakdown of carbs, sugars and proteins. It’s a great way to get visibility about what you’re putting in your body.

Easy to tailor to you

Hate an option? You can simply refresh it and the app will autogenerate a similar energy alternative for you to eat instead. There seems to be limitless options on there.

You can also swap around the order of meals, so if you want to have your breakfast at dinner and your dinner for breakfast (althought we don’t know why you would), you can.

It’s free

The basic model of the website is free. (Woo!)

The downside

The major downside to this app is that it doesn’t claim to be completely nutritionally balanced, and being auto-generated, it can’t completely understand what your body needs.

It goes off the information you tell it, but it won’t be able to assess you. Long story short, you’re still better to visit a professional if you’re trying to lose weight.

If you do decide to use the app, we would still advise that you consult an accredited nutritionist or dietitian to confirm that what’s on your grocery list is right for you.

But if you’re just interested to get some new meal ideas or struggling to manage your energy intake, it’s a helpful extra resource to spark simple, wholefood, delicious recipes.

If you’re curious, you can try the app out here. I did, and based on an intake of 1700 calories, the below was planned out for me.

Option 1:

  • Tropical green smoothie (568 calories): pineapple, mangoes, spinach, kale, coconut milk
  • Tuna stuffed pepper (424 calories): Red bell pepper, tuna, cucumber, mustard
  • Beef stir fry + pan roasted asparagus (693 calories): olive oil, mixed veg, soy sauce, beef. Asparagus, garlic.

Option 2:

  • Almond butter berry protein smoothie (448 calories): whey protein, almond butter, strawberries, raspberries, ice cubes, water
  • Ham and egg scramble (583 calories): ham, egg, cayenne pepper, turmeric
  • BBQ Chicken sandwich and spicy garlic broccoli (663 calories): chicken, bread, bbq sauce, cheddar, cayenne pepper. Garlic, broccoli, chicken broth.

Option 3:

  • Coconut peach smoothie and strawberries (471 calories): coconut milk, ice, chia seeds, egg white, peaches, lemon juice. Strawberries (whole).
  • Deli roast beef, provolone and red bell pepper lettuce wrap (463 calories): roast beef, provolone cheese, lettuce, red bell pepper, wrap, Dijon mustard.
  • Easy grilled chicken with garlic and cream cheese cauliflower ‘mash potato’ (556 calories): chicken, Italian dressing, red bell pepper, zucchini. Cauliflower, garlic, cream cheese.

I don’t know about you – but that sounds delicious!